Monday, 7 January 2013

Flat Iron


Starting out as a pop-up at Shoreditch’s Owl And The Pussycat, Flat Iron is a basic proposition of the eponymous affordable cut of steak, served with the usual accompaniments quickly and efficiently. Steak for the people, if you will. But with a hipster edge and some burgeoning meat cleaver infamy.

It’s a tough one (arf) hawking lesser cuts of meat because punters still have quite high expectations for steak in any context. It’s a treat. And so it is judged more harshly than a burger at the same price point. This isn’t the best steak you’ll ever have, but it is ten pounds. And for that ten pounds, you get an attractive spread of grilled and sliced flatiron (it’s the name of the cut also) and a tiny yet delicious lamb’s lettuce salad.


The steak is cooked exactly to order; yes it does require a little more jaw work than a boring fillet but you are rewarded with a  richness of flavour through a good amount of juicy marbled fat. It’s decent. Very decent. And it’s ten pounds.

Chips are £2.50 and up there with London’s finest. Superb and exactly how I like them. A modest double-fried I would say, but with smaller chips meaning loads of crispy scraps at the bottom, like batter scraps from a Geordie chip shop. 

Sauces are a quid each, we had both a peppercorn and a bĂ©arnaise which were great. House red was an Italian which was spot on – not too thin and acidic like many cheaper Italian reds can be, but most overly fruity either. Perfect.


Service was friendly, both tap water and beef-dripping popcorn (!) were provided without any prompt,  and of course the mini meat cleavers are a lot of fun.

It’s easy to criticise Flat Iron because clearly one can pay more to know a cow’s birthday and be happy that they were frequently massaged in between sups of beer. But as an overall experience and in the context of value (not to mention one you can do for a weekday lunch on your own dollar) it’s hard to beat. Especially for ten English pounds.


I’m not a fan of AA Gill’s particularly, and nor of Brasserie Zedel which I think is about comparable to a CafĂ© Rouge on the QE2, but I do agree that it democratises the brasserie through its pricing. Flat Iron arguably offers the same for steaks – albeit very niche rather than generalist. And that’s why I like it.

Not just because it’s affordable but because they’ve actually done something original and accessible in a sea of clones which should be commended. There was an idea, it then became a pop-up, was a hit and now it has a permanent home, which I admire a lot in terms of simple execution and fruition. It’s thoroughly pleasant place to spend an hour too. And did I mention the price?

Flat Iron on Urbanspoon

4 comments:

  1. Really glad we are doing something you like and thanks for writing about it. Particularly glad that our efforts with the chips are not in vein (cut by hand fresh each day, then triple cooked in dripping). On the steak, wonder if I could convince you to try it medium rare? Flat Iron is a strange cut in that it seems to get significantly more tender when taken to medium rare, more so than any other. Hope to see you back soon!

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  2. You're welcome. I'll certainly be back again and will try medium-rare. I like it rare usually but do miss the warmth, and when already sliced it goes cold even more quickly.

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  3. Agree with charlie, flat iron has to be cooked to medium-rare really or else the connective tissues have no chance to breakdown at all. I haven't been so can go together if you're keen?

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  4. Yes, massively keen to medium-rare it. Mid Feb after DB would work...

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